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BLOGHere you can read about what is going on with Asian Eye Care. Besides news you can find reports from the field and portraits from our patients and volunteers.

Our patients: Mr. Guoragang is going to enjoy his pension


As a primary school principal in the village of Nakaew and father of as many as 10 children, Mr. Guoragang has always led an active life. He is 68 now and has just had his left eye operated on. A couple of years ago, his other eye was operated on. The cataract made him stop […]

Our patients: Mr. Onhthong does not give in too easily


Mr. Onhthong lives in Xaisawaang, a village just outside Pakse. Although he is 65 and his pension is drawing near, it made him sad when he could no longer do his job properly because of his cataract. Mr. Onhthong is a teacher at a military academy and he is proud of what he has achieved. […]

Our patients: Mr. Ngoead (62) had not much to lose


Mr. Ngoead, who has lived in the village of Vangtao all his life, had more or less reconciled himself to his handicap. Within five years, the eyesight in both his eyes had deteriorated so much, that his family had to help him with everything he did. This often made him feel very sad. When a […]

Our patients: Mrs. Mone (73) hates to be dependent


Mrs. Mone from the village of More has worked in the fields her whole life, and she also takes care of the household. She is not the type that complains and also when she noticed that her eyesight was gradually deteriorating, she was not easily daunted. But it was difficult for her to accept that […]

Our patients: Mrs. Obma (70) enjoys her daily routine


The life of Mrs. Obma’s, from Haykham, had always been fully absorbed by her housekeeping. As a mother of eight children, she did not have much choice either; this is probably the life she was meant to live. That is why her family means everything to her and now that she has turned almost completely […]

Our patients: Mr. Bounmi (63) felt lonesome for a long time


Mr. Bounmi from Sapansay knows exactly how he felt when he realized that he was gradually going blind: lonesome and helpless. He was reduced from a valued technician to an invalid, pitiful person. Although he did not live far from the hospital, for a very long time he had been reluctant to see a doctor. […]